A message from totalbookbabe
What is the point of not shaving your armpits? I just don't understand.
A reply from hairypitsclub

What’s the point of shaving them?

fleurdelunaa:

breakfast this morning served in the bath

😍😍😍
fleurdelunaa:

breakfast this morning served in the bath

😍😍😍
fleurdelunaa:

breakfast this morning served in the bath

😍😍😍

fleurdelunaa:

breakfast this morning served in the bath

😍😍😍

dani-misfit-prince-prod:

ladyanastaciaspencer:

Happy 43rd Birthday Selena Quintanilla-Perez {April 16, 1971}

Yas
dani-misfit-prince-prod:

ladyanastaciaspencer:

Happy 43rd Birthday Selena Quintanilla-Perez {April 16, 1971}

Yas
dani-misfit-prince-prod:

ladyanastaciaspencer:

Happy 43rd Birthday Selena Quintanilla-Perez {April 16, 1971}

Yas
dani-misfit-prince-prod:

ladyanastaciaspencer:

Happy 43rd Birthday Selena Quintanilla-Perez {April 16, 1971}

Yas
dani-misfit-prince-prod:

ladyanastaciaspencer:

Happy 43rd Birthday Selena Quintanilla-Perez {April 16, 1971}

Yas
dani-misfit-prince-prod:

ladyanastaciaspencer:

Happy 43rd Birthday Selena Quintanilla-Perez {April 16, 1971}

Yas
dani-misfit-prince-prod:

ladyanastaciaspencer:

Happy 43rd Birthday Selena Quintanilla-Perez {April 16, 1971}

Yas
dani-misfit-prince-prod:

ladyanastaciaspencer:

Happy 43rd Birthday Selena Quintanilla-Perez {April 16, 1971}

Yas
dani-misfit-prince-prod:

ladyanastaciaspencer:

Happy 43rd Birthday Selena Quintanilla-Perez {April 16, 1971}

Yas
dani-misfit-prince-prod:

ladyanastaciaspencer:

Happy 43rd Birthday Selena Quintanilla-Perez {April 16, 1971}

Yas

dani-misfit-prince-prod:

ladyanastaciaspencer:

Happy 43rd Birthday Selena Quintanilla-Perez {April 16, 1971}

Yas

"The stereotypes do not cause transsexualism, they confuse trans-sexuals, and the rest of us, and we have to find our own way out, through our own judgement of arguments and our own experiences of living, not by having them denied to us. Trans-sexuals, like all of us, are caught in a net of oppressive gender expectations, which we have to sort out as best we can, in situations where the social agencies to which we may refer only make our problem worse. But it is not trans-sexualism which is the problem but the way we are pressured to live in the world."
-Carol S Riddle, Divided Sisterhood (1980)
dynamicafrica:

"The Untold Renaissance": Ikire Jones Spring/Summer 2014 Lookbook.
It’s all dapper hommes, suave strides and bold prints and patterns in Nigerian designer Wale Oyejide’s Spring/Summer 2014 lookbook for his brand Ikire Jones.
“This collection pays homage to 18th century textiles and tapestries while exploring the absence of persons of color in Medieval and Renaissance-era European art.  Borrowing from the sampling method employed in hip hop culture, each reinvented piece tells an original narrative from the perspective of Africans who have been placed in an alien context.  Through this reverse lens to the past, the present circumstances of individuals who feel displaced and alienated may also be considered.”
dynamicafrica:

"The Untold Renaissance": Ikire Jones Spring/Summer 2014 Lookbook.
It’s all dapper hommes, suave strides and bold prints and patterns in Nigerian designer Wale Oyejide’s Spring/Summer 2014 lookbook for his brand Ikire Jones.
“This collection pays homage to 18th century textiles and tapestries while exploring the absence of persons of color in Medieval and Renaissance-era European art.  Borrowing from the sampling method employed in hip hop culture, each reinvented piece tells an original narrative from the perspective of Africans who have been placed in an alien context.  Through this reverse lens to the past, the present circumstances of individuals who feel displaced and alienated may also be considered.”
dynamicafrica:

"The Untold Renaissance": Ikire Jones Spring/Summer 2014 Lookbook.
It’s all dapper hommes, suave strides and bold prints and patterns in Nigerian designer Wale Oyejide’s Spring/Summer 2014 lookbook for his brand Ikire Jones.
“This collection pays homage to 18th century textiles and tapestries while exploring the absence of persons of color in Medieval and Renaissance-era European art.  Borrowing from the sampling method employed in hip hop culture, each reinvented piece tells an original narrative from the perspective of Africans who have been placed in an alien context.  Through this reverse lens to the past, the present circumstances of individuals who feel displaced and alienated may also be considered.”
dynamicafrica:

"The Untold Renaissance": Ikire Jones Spring/Summer 2014 Lookbook.
It’s all dapper hommes, suave strides and bold prints and patterns in Nigerian designer Wale Oyejide’s Spring/Summer 2014 lookbook for his brand Ikire Jones.
“This collection pays homage to 18th century textiles and tapestries while exploring the absence of persons of color in Medieval and Renaissance-era European art.  Borrowing from the sampling method employed in hip hop culture, each reinvented piece tells an original narrative from the perspective of Africans who have been placed in an alien context.  Through this reverse lens to the past, the present circumstances of individuals who feel displaced and alienated may also be considered.”
dynamicafrica:

"The Untold Renaissance": Ikire Jones Spring/Summer 2014 Lookbook.
It’s all dapper hommes, suave strides and bold prints and patterns in Nigerian designer Wale Oyejide’s Spring/Summer 2014 lookbook for his brand Ikire Jones.
“This collection pays homage to 18th century textiles and tapestries while exploring the absence of persons of color in Medieval and Renaissance-era European art.  Borrowing from the sampling method employed in hip hop culture, each reinvented piece tells an original narrative from the perspective of Africans who have been placed in an alien context.  Through this reverse lens to the past, the present circumstances of individuals who feel displaced and alienated may also be considered.”
dynamicafrica:

"The Untold Renaissance": Ikire Jones Spring/Summer 2014 Lookbook.
It’s all dapper hommes, suave strides and bold prints and patterns in Nigerian designer Wale Oyejide’s Spring/Summer 2014 lookbook for his brand Ikire Jones.
“This collection pays homage to 18th century textiles and tapestries while exploring the absence of persons of color in Medieval and Renaissance-era European art.  Borrowing from the sampling method employed in hip hop culture, each reinvented piece tells an original narrative from the perspective of Africans who have been placed in an alien context.  Through this reverse lens to the past, the present circumstances of individuals who feel displaced and alienated may also be considered.”
dynamicafrica:

"The Untold Renaissance": Ikire Jones Spring/Summer 2014 Lookbook.
It’s all dapper hommes, suave strides and bold prints and patterns in Nigerian designer Wale Oyejide’s Spring/Summer 2014 lookbook for his brand Ikire Jones.
“This collection pays homage to 18th century textiles and tapestries while exploring the absence of persons of color in Medieval and Renaissance-era European art.  Borrowing from the sampling method employed in hip hop culture, each reinvented piece tells an original narrative from the perspective of Africans who have been placed in an alien context.  Through this reverse lens to the past, the present circumstances of individuals who feel displaced and alienated may also be considered.”
dynamicafrica:

"The Untold Renaissance": Ikire Jones Spring/Summer 2014 Lookbook.
It’s all dapper hommes, suave strides and bold prints and patterns in Nigerian designer Wale Oyejide’s Spring/Summer 2014 lookbook for his brand Ikire Jones.
“This collection pays homage to 18th century textiles and tapestries while exploring the absence of persons of color in Medieval and Renaissance-era European art.  Borrowing from the sampling method employed in hip hop culture, each reinvented piece tells an original narrative from the perspective of Africans who have been placed in an alien context.  Through this reverse lens to the past, the present circumstances of individuals who feel displaced and alienated may also be considered.”

dynamicafrica:

"The Untold Renaissance": Ikire Jones Spring/Summer 2014 Lookbook.

It’s all dapper hommes, suave strides and bold prints and patterns in Nigerian designer Wale Oyejide’s Spring/Summer 2014 lookbook for his brand Ikire Jones.

“This collection pays homage to 18th century textiles and tapestries while exploring the absence of persons of color in Medieval and Renaissance-era European art.  Borrowing from the sampling method employed in hip hop culture, each reinvented piece tells an original narrative from the perspective of Africans who have been placed in an alien context.  Through this reverse lens to the past, the present circumstances of individuals who feel displaced and alienated may also be considered.”

"When I say “I love you,” its not because I want you or because I can’t have you. It has nothing to do with me. I love what you are, what you do, and how you try. I’ve seen your kindness and your strength. I’ve seen the best and the worst of you. And I understand with perfect clarity exactly what and who you are."

Joss Whedon  (via the-heart-of-the-lion)

Fucking Joss.

Guh.

Geez.

(via brownroundboi)

"Find someone that doesn’t just plant flowers in the worst part of you, but waters the dead ones."
violum (via violum)
"

It reminds me of the “bike to work” movement. That is also portrayed as white, but in my city more than half of the people on bike are not white. I was once talking to a white activist who was photographing “bike commuters” and had only pictures of white people with the occasional “Black professional” I asked her why she didn’t photograph the delivery people, construction workers etc. … ie. the Black and [Latin@] and Asian people… and she mumbled something about trying to “improve the image of biking” then admitted that she didn’t really see them as part of the “green movement” since they “probably have no choice” –

I was so mad I wanted to quit working on the project she and I were collaborating on.

So, in the same way when people in a poor neighborhood grow food in their yards … it’s just being poor– but when white people do it they are saving the earth or something.

"
comment left on the Racialious blog post “Sustainable Food & Privilege: Why is Green always White (and Male and Upper-Class)” (via meggannn)
vforvisual:

"Cigarettes and coffee man, now that’s a combination" -Coffee and Cigarettes (2003)
vforvisual:

"Cigarettes and coffee man, now that’s a combination" -Coffee and Cigarettes (2003)

vforvisual:

"Cigarettes and coffee man, now that’s a combination" -Coffee and Cigarettes (2003)

ouyangdan:

crewdlydrawn:

allthingslinguistic:

hyperboreanhapocanthosaurus:



So you know what I don’t get? Why people repeat words. (x)

Grammar time: it’s called “contrastive reduplication,” and it’s a form of intensification that is relatively common. Finnish does a very similar thing, and others use near-reduplication (rhyme-based) to intensify, like Hungarian (pici ‘tiny’, ici-pici ‘very tiny’).
Even the typologically-distant group of Bantu languages utilize reduplication in a strikingly similar fashion with nouns: Kinande oku-gulu ‘leg’, oku-gulu-gulu ‘a REAL leg’ (Downing 2001, includes more with verbal reduplication as well).
I suppose the difficult aspect of English reduplication is not through this particular type, but the fact that it utilizes many other types of reduplication: baby talk (choo-choo, no-no), rhyming (teeny-weeny, super-duper), and the ever-famous “shm” reduplication: fancy-schmancy (a way of denying the claim that something is fancy).

screams my professor was trying to find an example of reduplication so the next class he came back and said “I FOUND REDUPLICATION IN ENGLISH” and then he said “Milk milk” and everyone was just “what?” and he said “you know when you go to a coffee shop and they ask if you want soy milk and you say ‘no i want milk milk’” and everyone just had this collective sigh of understanding.

Another name for this particular construction is contrastive focus reduplication, and there’s a famous linguistics paper about it which is commonly known as the Salad Salad Paper. You know, because if you want to make it clear that you’re not talking about pasta salad or potato salad, you might call it “salad salad”. The repetition indicates that you’re intending the most prototypical meaning of the word, like green salad or cow’s milk, even though other things can be considered types of salad or milk. 

Can I make love to this post?… Is that a thing that’s possible?

i just had a linguistgasm.
ouyangdan:

crewdlydrawn:

allthingslinguistic:

hyperboreanhapocanthosaurus:



So you know what I don’t get? Why people repeat words. (x)

Grammar time: it’s called “contrastive reduplication,” and it’s a form of intensification that is relatively common. Finnish does a very similar thing, and others use near-reduplication (rhyme-based) to intensify, like Hungarian (pici ‘tiny’, ici-pici ‘very tiny’).
Even the typologically-distant group of Bantu languages utilize reduplication in a strikingly similar fashion with nouns: Kinande oku-gulu ‘leg’, oku-gulu-gulu ‘a REAL leg’ (Downing 2001, includes more with verbal reduplication as well).
I suppose the difficult aspect of English reduplication is not through this particular type, but the fact that it utilizes many other types of reduplication: baby talk (choo-choo, no-no), rhyming (teeny-weeny, super-duper), and the ever-famous “shm” reduplication: fancy-schmancy (a way of denying the claim that something is fancy).

screams my professor was trying to find an example of reduplication so the next class he came back and said “I FOUND REDUPLICATION IN ENGLISH” and then he said “Milk milk” and everyone was just “what?” and he said “you know when you go to a coffee shop and they ask if you want soy milk and you say ‘no i want milk milk’” and everyone just had this collective sigh of understanding.

Another name for this particular construction is contrastive focus reduplication, and there’s a famous linguistics paper about it which is commonly known as the Salad Salad Paper. You know, because if you want to make it clear that you’re not talking about pasta salad or potato salad, you might call it “salad salad”. The repetition indicates that you’re intending the most prototypical meaning of the word, like green salad or cow’s milk, even though other things can be considered types of salad or milk. 

Can I make love to this post?… Is that a thing that’s possible?

i just had a linguistgasm.
ouyangdan:

crewdlydrawn:

allthingslinguistic:

hyperboreanhapocanthosaurus:



So you know what I don’t get? Why people repeat words. (x)

Grammar time: it’s called “contrastive reduplication,” and it’s a form of intensification that is relatively common. Finnish does a very similar thing, and others use near-reduplication (rhyme-based) to intensify, like Hungarian (pici ‘tiny’, ici-pici ‘very tiny’).
Even the typologically-distant group of Bantu languages utilize reduplication in a strikingly similar fashion with nouns: Kinande oku-gulu ‘leg’, oku-gulu-gulu ‘a REAL leg’ (Downing 2001, includes more with verbal reduplication as well).
I suppose the difficult aspect of English reduplication is not through this particular type, but the fact that it utilizes many other types of reduplication: baby talk (choo-choo, no-no), rhyming (teeny-weeny, super-duper), and the ever-famous “shm” reduplication: fancy-schmancy (a way of denying the claim that something is fancy).

screams my professor was trying to find an example of reduplication so the next class he came back and said “I FOUND REDUPLICATION IN ENGLISH” and then he said “Milk milk” and everyone was just “what?” and he said “you know when you go to a coffee shop and they ask if you want soy milk and you say ‘no i want milk milk’” and everyone just had this collective sigh of understanding.

Another name for this particular construction is contrastive focus reduplication, and there’s a famous linguistics paper about it which is commonly known as the Salad Salad Paper. You know, because if you want to make it clear that you’re not talking about pasta salad or potato salad, you might call it “salad salad”. The repetition indicates that you’re intending the most prototypical meaning of the word, like green salad or cow’s milk, even though other things can be considered types of salad or milk. 

Can I make love to this post?… Is that a thing that’s possible?

i just had a linguistgasm.

ouyangdan:

crewdlydrawn:

allthingslinguistic:

hyperboreanhapocanthosaurus:

So you know what I don’t get? Why people repeat words. (x)

Grammar time: it’s called “contrastive reduplication,” and it’s a form of intensification that is relatively common. Finnish does a very similar thing, and others use near-reduplication (rhyme-based) to intensify, like Hungarian (pici ‘tiny’, ici-pici ‘very tiny’).

Even the typologically-distant group of Bantu languages utilize reduplication in a strikingly similar fashion with nouns: Kinande oku-gulu ‘leg’, oku-gulu-gulu ‘a REAL leg’ (Downing 2001, includes more with verbal reduplication as well).

I suppose the difficult aspect of English reduplication is not through this particular type, but the fact that it utilizes many other types of reduplication: baby talk (choo-choo, no-no), rhyming (teeny-weeny, super-duper), and the ever-famous “shm” reduplication: fancy-schmancy (a way of denying the claim that something is fancy).

screams my professor was trying to find an example of reduplication so the next class he came back and said “I FOUND REDUPLICATION IN ENGLISH” and then he said “Milk milk” and everyone was just “what?” and he said “you know when you go to a coffee shop and they ask if you want soy milk and you say ‘no i want milk milk’” and everyone just had this collective sigh of understanding.

Another name for this particular construction is contrastive focus reduplication, and there’s a famous linguistics paper about it which is commonly known as the Salad Salad Paper. You know, because if you want to make it clear that you’re not talking about pasta salad or potato salad, you might call it “salad salad”. The repetition indicates that you’re intending the most prototypical meaning of the word, like green salad or cow’s milk, even though other things can be considered types of salad or milk. 

Can I make love to this post?… Is that a thing that’s possible?

i just had a linguistgasm.

Dreamy Sunday morning with my favorite guy.

Dreamy Sunday morning with my favorite guy.

@thisfckinguy appreciation post. killin’ it. #saro #chicagostreetart #chicago

comeunbraced:

autistpsyche:

you should check out #AcademicAbleism on twitter, if you haven’t already. 

SO MUCH OF THIS IS JUST YES— the 6th one, the 8th one ring especially true for me <33

This is a huge part of why I’ve decided I’ll never go back to school.  I barely made it through undergrad, & it nearly killed me.
comeunbraced:

autistpsyche:

you should check out #AcademicAbleism on twitter, if you haven’t already. 

SO MUCH OF THIS IS JUST YES— the 6th one, the 8th one ring especially true for me <33

This is a huge part of why I’ve decided I’ll never go back to school.  I barely made it through undergrad, & it nearly killed me.
comeunbraced:

autistpsyche:

you should check out #AcademicAbleism on twitter, if you haven’t already. 

SO MUCH OF THIS IS JUST YES— the 6th one, the 8th one ring especially true for me <33

This is a huge part of why I’ve decided I’ll never go back to school.  I barely made it through undergrad, & it nearly killed me.
comeunbraced:

autistpsyche:

you should check out #AcademicAbleism on twitter, if you haven’t already. 

SO MUCH OF THIS IS JUST YES— the 6th one, the 8th one ring especially true for me <33

This is a huge part of why I’ve decided I’ll never go back to school.  I barely made it through undergrad, & it nearly killed me.
comeunbraced:

autistpsyche:

you should check out #AcademicAbleism on twitter, if you haven’t already. 

SO MUCH OF THIS IS JUST YES— the 6th one, the 8th one ring especially true for me <33

This is a huge part of why I’ve decided I’ll never go back to school.  I barely made it through undergrad, & it nearly killed me.
comeunbraced:

autistpsyche:

you should check out #AcademicAbleism on twitter, if you haven’t already. 

SO MUCH OF THIS IS JUST YES— the 6th one, the 8th one ring especially true for me <33

This is a huge part of why I’ve decided I’ll never go back to school.  I barely made it through undergrad, & it nearly killed me.
comeunbraced:

autistpsyche:

you should check out #AcademicAbleism on twitter, if you haven’t already. 

SO MUCH OF THIS IS JUST YES— the 6th one, the 8th one ring especially true for me <33

This is a huge part of why I’ve decided I’ll never go back to school.  I barely made it through undergrad, & it nearly killed me.
comeunbraced:

autistpsyche:

you should check out #AcademicAbleism on twitter, if you haven’t already. 

SO MUCH OF THIS IS JUST YES— the 6th one, the 8th one ring especially true for me <33

This is a huge part of why I’ve decided I’ll never go back to school.  I barely made it through undergrad, & it nearly killed me.
comeunbraced:

autistpsyche:

you should check out #AcademicAbleism on twitter, if you haven’t already. 

SO MUCH OF THIS IS JUST YES— the 6th one, the 8th one ring especially true for me <33

This is a huge part of why I’ve decided I’ll never go back to school.  I barely made it through undergrad, & it nearly killed me.
comeunbraced:

autistpsyche:

you should check out #AcademicAbleism on twitter, if you haven’t already. 

SO MUCH OF THIS IS JUST YES— the 6th one, the 8th one ring especially true for me <33

This is a huge part of why I’ve decided I’ll never go back to school.  I barely made it through undergrad, & it nearly killed me.

comeunbraced:

autistpsyche:

you should check out #AcademicAbleism on twitter, if you haven’t already. 

SO MUCH OF THIS IS JUST YES— the 6th one, the 8th one ring especially true for me <33

This is a huge part of why I’ve decided I’ll never go back to school. I barely made it through undergrad, & it nearly killed me.